Daniel Berehulak: Ο φωτογράφος που έφτασε στις γειτονιές που "θερίζει" ο ιός Έμπολα

MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 18, 2014: Members of a Liberian Red Cross burial team, under contract from the Liberian Ministry of Health, remove the body of a suspected Ebola victim Lorpu David, 30 on September 18, 2014 in the Gurley street community in central Monrovia, Liberia.We came here for the husband last week, were back today for the wife, and maybe next week well be back for the children, said Alexander Nyanti, 23, a burial team member who was recovering the body of Lorpu David, 30, in a central Monrovia neighborhood off Gurley Street. A week earlier, his team had visited the same house to retrieve the body of her husband, Sam David, the first Ebola death in that community. The couple shared one room with their two children and the wifes younger sister. The little boy is not feeling all right, John Sackie, the communitys chairman, said as four members of the burial team pulled Ms. David out of a dark room in the back of a house, each grasping a limb. But others from the community had clearly been exposed. Teddy Momo, 36, the late husbands nephew, said he had taken the ailing Ms. David to one of the citys three Ebola treatment centers, riding in the front passenger seat of a taxi as Ms. David shared the back seat with her two children and sister. Turned back because of a lack of beds, the group took the taxi back to Gurley Street. But Ms. David slipped and hit her chin on a rocky path leading to her house. A neighbor carried her home where she died immediately, Mr. Momo said.


Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 18, 2014: Members of a Liberian Red Cross burial team, under contract from the Liberian Ministry of Health, remove the body of a suspected Ebola victim Lorpu David, 30 on September 18, 2014 in the Gurley street community in central Monrovia, Liberia.We came here for the husband last week, were back today for the wife, and maybe next week well be back for the children, said Alexander Nyanti, 23, a burial team member who was recovering the body of Lorpu David, 30, in a central Monrovia neighborhood off Gurley Street. A week earlier, his team had visited the same house to retrieve the body of her husband, Sam David, the first Ebola death in that community. The couple shared one room with their two children and the wifes younger sister. The little boy is not feeling all right, John Sackie, the communitys chairman, said as four members of the burial team pulled Ms. David out of a dark room in the back of a house, each grasping a limb. But others from the community had clearly been exposed. Teddy Momo, 36, the late husbands nephew, said he had taken the ailing Ms. David to one of the citys three Ebola treatment centers, riding in the front passenger seat of a taxi as Ms. David shared the back seat with her two children and sister. Turned back because of a lack of beds, the group took the taxi back to Gurley Street. But Ms. David slipped and hit her chin on a rocky path leading to her house. A neighbor carried her home where she died immediately, Mr. Momo said. Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times DANIEL BEREHULAK

Φωτογραφίες "γροθιά στο στομάχι" κατέγραψε με το φακό του ο φωτορεπόρτερ Daniel Berehulak στη Λιβερία που δοκιμάζεται από το ιό Έμπολα (Pics)

Στην Μονρόβια της Λιβερίας βρέθηκε για λογαριασμό των New York Times, ο φωτορεπόρτερ  Daniel Berehulak ώστε να καταγράψει με το φακό του την επιδημία του ιού 'Εμπολα στη Χώρα.

Ο Berehulak έφτασε για πρώτη φορά στη Μονρόβια στις 22 Αυγούστου έχοντας μαζί του 300 ζευγάρια, γυαλιά, χειρουργικές μάσκες και αμέτρητους ρολούς ταινίας.

Φτάνοντας στη Λιβερία ο Berehulak επισκέφθηκε το σπίτι μιας γυναίκας που είχε προσβληθεί από τον ιό Έμπολα και πέθανε περιτριγυρισμένη από την οικογένειά της.

Ο ιός του Έμπολα εξαπλώνεται με γεωμετρική πρόοδο στη Λιβερία, όπου τις ερχόμενες εβδομάδες αναμένεται να αναφερθούν πολλές χιλιάδες νέα κρούσματα.

Τουλάχιστον 2.917 άνθρωποι έχουν πεθάνει από Έμπολα από τους 6.263 που έχουν προσβληθεί από τον ιό στις πέντε χώρες της Δυτικής Αφρικής, οι οποίες έχουν πληγεί

A resident of the West Point neighborhood covers his nose as a burial team departed with a body in Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 17, 2014. With the severe shortage of treatment centers, many apparent Ebola patients are dying at home, often infecting family members, neighbors and others in a circle of contagion. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times)
A resident of the West Point neighborhood covers his nose as a burial team departed with a body in Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 17, 2014. With the severe shortage of treatment centers, many apparent Ebola patients are dying at home, often infecting family members, neighbors and others in a circle of contagion. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times) DANIEL BEREHULAK/THE NEW YORK TI
Friends and relatives weep as a burial team removes the body of a 75-year-old woman who neighbors insisted died of a stroke, in a neighborhood called PHP in Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 18, 2014. The leader of the burial team said that the community, caught up in its own denials, continued to engage in funeral practices that helped spread Ebola. ìThey told me that somebody even bathed the old womanís body,î he said. With the severe shortage of treatment centers, many apparent Ebola patients are dying at home, often infecting family members, neighbors and others in a circle of contagion. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times)
Friends and relatives weep as a burial team removes the body of a 75-year-old woman who neighbors insisted died of a stroke, in a neighborhood called PHP in Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 18, 2014. The leader of the burial team said that the community, caught up in its own denials, continued to engage in funeral practices that helped spread Ebola. ìThey told me that somebody even bathed the old womanís body,î he said. With the severe shortage of treatment centers, many apparent Ebola patients are dying at home, often infecting family members, neighbors and others in a circle of contagion. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times) DANIEL BEREHULAK/THE NEW YORK TI
Eric Gweah, 25, grieves as he watches members of a Red Cross burial team carry the body his father, Ofori Gweah, 62, a suspected Ebola victim, in a riverside area called Rock Spring Valley in central Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 18, 2014. Ofori Gweah had endured Ebolaís telltale symptoms for six days, his family took him to treatment centers twice, only to be turned back. So many Ebola victims are dying at home due to a severe shortage of treatment centers in Monrovia, and many of the ill are infecting family members, neighbors and others in a ballooning circle of contagion. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times)
Eric Gweah, 25, grieves as he watches members of a Red Cross burial team carry the body his father, Ofori Gweah, 62, a suspected Ebola victim, in a riverside area called Rock Spring Valley in central Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 18, 2014. Ofori Gweah had endured Ebolaís telltale symptoms for six days, his family took him to treatment centers twice, only to be turned back. So many Ebola victims are dying at home due to a severe shortage of treatment centers in Monrovia, and many of the ill are infecting family members, neighbors and others in a ballooning circle of contagion. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times) DANIEL BEREHULAK/THE NEW YORK TI
A burial team collects the body of a 75-year-old woman in a neighborhood called PHP in Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 18, 2014. Community leaders insisted that she had died of a stroke, but Mark Korvayan, the burial teamís leader, recalled picking up two bodies from the same room in the past month. With the severe shortage of treatment centers, many apparent Ebola patients are dying at home, often infecting family members, neighbors and others in a circle of contagion. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times)
A burial team collects the body of a 75-year-old woman in a neighborhood called PHP in Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 18, 2014. Community leaders insisted that she had died of a stroke, but Mark Korvayan, the burial teamís leader, recalled picking up two bodies from the same room in the past month. With the severe shortage of treatment centers, many apparent Ebola patients are dying at home, often infecting family members, neighbors and others in a circle of contagion. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times) DANIEL BEREHULAK/THE NEW YORK TI
Residents look on as the body of a man suspected of dying from Ebola lies in a busy street, after it was reportedly dragged there to draw attention of burial teams following days of failed attempts by his family to have his body picked up, in Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 15, 2014. On Tuesday, President Barack Obama is to visit the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta where he is scheduled to discuss the Ebola crisis. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times)
Residents look on as the body of a man suspected of dying from Ebola lies in a busy street, after it was reportedly dragged there to draw attention of burial teams following days of failed attempts by his family to have his body picked up, in Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 15, 2014. On Tuesday, President Barack Obama is to visit the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta where he is scheduled to discuss the Ebola crisis. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times) DANIEL BEREHULAK/THE NEW YORK TI
Residents of the West Point neighborhood attend church after a 10-day quarantine was lifted in Monrovia, Liberia, Aug. 31, 2014. Liberia remains desperately short on everything needed to halt the spread of Ebola, but an epidemiologist is working block by block to fill a crucial need: the support of residents. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times)
Residents of the West Point neighborhood attend church after a 10-day quarantine was lifted in Monrovia, Liberia, Aug. 31, 2014. Liberia remains desperately short on everything needed to halt the spread of Ebola, but an epidemiologist is working block by block to fill a crucial need: the support of residents. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times) DANIEL BEREHULAK/THE NEW YORK TI
Residents discuss an Ebola awareness campaign in Monrovia, Liberia, Aug. 30, 2014. Liberia remains desperately short on everything needed to halt the spread of Ebola, but an epidemiologist is working block by block to fill a crucial need: the support of residents. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times)
Residents discuss an Ebola awareness campaign in Monrovia, Liberia, Aug. 30, 2014. Liberia remains desperately short on everything needed to halt the spread of Ebola, but an epidemiologist is working block by block to fill a crucial need: the support of residents. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times) DANIEL BEREHULAK/THE NEW YORK TI
Medical staff carry James Dorbor, 8, suspected of having Ebola, into a treatment facility in Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 5, 2014.  Ebola ó the reality and the hysteria over it ó  is having a serious economic impact on Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, three nations already at the bottom of global economic and social indicators. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times)
Medical staff carry James Dorbor, 8, suspected of having Ebola, into a treatment facility in Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 5, 2014. Ebola ó the reality and the hysteria over it ó is having a serious economic impact on Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, three nations already at the bottom of global economic and social indicators. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times) DANIEL BEREHULAK/THE NEW YORK TI
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 18, 2014: Members of a Liberian Red Cross burial team, under contract from the Liberian Ministry of Health, remove the body of a suspected Ebola victim Lorpu David, 30 on September 18, 2014 in the Gurley street community in central Monrovia, Liberia.We came here for the husband last week, were back today for the wife, and maybe next week well be back for the children, said Alexander Nyanti, 23, a burial team member who was recovering the body of Lorpu David, 30, in a central Monrovia neighborhood off Gurley Street. A week earlier, his team had visited the same house to retrieve the body of her husband, Sam David, the first Ebola death in that community. The couple shared one room with their two children and the wifes younger sister. The little boy is not feeling all right, John Sackie, the communitys chairman, said as four members of the burial team pulled Ms. David out of a dark room in the back of a house, each grasping a limb. But others from the community had clearly been exposed. Teddy Momo, 36, the late husbands nephew, said he had taken the ailing Ms. David to one of the citys three Ebola treatment centers, riding in the front passenger seat of a taxi as Ms. David shared the back seat with her two children and sister. Turned back because of a lack of beds, the group took the taxi back to Gurley Street. But Ms. David slipped and hit her chin on a rocky path leading to her house. A neighbor carried her home where she died immediately, Mr. Momo said.


Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 18, 2014: Members of a Liberian Red Cross burial team, under contract from the Liberian Ministry of Health, remove the body of a suspected Ebola victim Lorpu David, 30 on September 18, 2014 in the Gurley street community in central Monrovia, Liberia.We came here for the husband last week, were back today for the wife, and maybe next week well be back for the children, said Alexander Nyanti, 23, a burial team member who was recovering the body of Lorpu David, 30, in a central Monrovia neighborhood off Gurley Street. A week earlier, his team had visited the same house to retrieve the body of her husband, Sam David, the first Ebola death in that community. The couple shared one room with their two children and the wifes younger sister. The little boy is not feeling all right, John Sackie, the communitys chairman, said as four members of the burial team pulled Ms. David out of a dark room in the back of a house, each grasping a limb. But others from the community had clearly been exposed. Teddy Momo, 36, the late husbands nephew, said he had taken the ailing Ms. David to one of the citys three Ebola treatment centers, riding in the front passenger seat of a taxi as Ms. David shared the back seat with her two children and sister. Turned back because of a lack of beds, the group took the taxi back to Gurley Street. But Ms. David slipped and hit her chin on a rocky path leading to her house. A neighbor carried her home where she died immediately, Mr. Momo said. Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times DANIEL BEREHULAK
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 18, 2014: Marvin Gweah, 28, is overcome by emotion as members of a Liberian Red Cross burial team, carry away the body of his father, Ofori Gweah, 62, a suspected Ebola victim, on September 18, 2014 in central Monrovia, Liberia. Members of the burial team descended to the compound four times in the past four weeks, down a steep cliff to a riverside area called Rock Spring Valley. Each week, they had picked up a body that passed on the Ebola virus to the next person, this their fifth. 
The family of the dead man, sick for six days with Ebolas telltale symptoms, had taken Mr Ofori Gweah, 62,  twice by taxi to treatments centres, only to be turned back at the gate for lack of beds. He died in his own bed, his arms thrashing violently and blood spewing out of his mouth, in front of his sons. 
The only thing the government can do is come for bodies - they are killing us, said Eric Gweah, 25. Another son, Marvin Gweah, 28, screamed, If the government cant work it out, let them give it up. Let the international community hand this.

Mr Ofori Gweah, the landlord of a compound, was the 5th death of the month from the same compound. The 1st death on August 14th was Dr Wleh, a medic that ran the clinic in the Rock Spring neighbourhood of Monrovia. The second, on the 21st of August, was the Dr's wife, Rachel Wleh. On the 31st of August their son Larry died. Then on September 6, Larry's grandmother died. Mr Ofori Gweah, took the grandmother into his home, after Larry died, as she had nobody else to look after her. 
According to family members, Mr Gweah handled her mattress. 
Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 18, 2014: Marvin Gweah, 28, is overcome by emotion as members of a Liberian Red Cross burial team, carry away the body of his father, Ofori Gweah, 62, a suspected Ebola victim, on September 18, 2014 in central Monrovia, Liberia. Members of the burial team descended to the compound four times in the past four weeks, down a steep cliff to a riverside area called Rock Spring Valley. Each week, they had picked up a body that passed on the Ebola virus to the next person, this their fifth. The family of the dead man, sick for six days with Ebolas telltale symptoms, had taken Mr Ofori Gweah, 62, twice by taxi to treatments centres, only to be turned back at the gate for lack of beds. He died in his own bed, his arms thrashing violently and blood spewing out of his mouth, in front of his sons. The only thing the government can do is come for bodies - they are killing us, said Eric Gweah, 25. Another son, Marvin Gweah, 28, screamed, If the government cant work it out, let them give it up. Let the international community hand this. Mr Ofori Gweah, the landlord of a compound, was the 5th death of the month from the same compound. The 1st death on August 14th was Dr Wleh, a medic that ran the clinic in the Rock Spring neighbourhood of Monrovia. The second, on the 21st of August, was the Dr's wife, Rachel Wleh. On the 31st of August their son Larry died. Then on September 6, Larry's grandmother died. Mr Ofori Gweah, took the grandmother into his home, after Larry died, as she had nobody else to look after her. According to family members, Mr Gweah handled her mattress. Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times DANIEL BEREHULAK
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 18, 2014: A relative grieves as a Liberian Red Cross burial team, dress themselves in full protective clothing, prior to removing the body of a suspected Ebola victim, Ofori Gweah, 62, on September 18, 2014 in central Monrovia, Liberia. Members of the burial team descended to the compound four times in the past four weeks, down a steep cliff to a riverside area here called Rockspring Valley. Each week, they had picked up a body that passed on the Ebola virus to the next person, and now they were back for the fifth. The crowd, seething beneath a sky of low clouds, erupted in anger.The family of the dead man, sick for six days with the hemorrhagic fevers telltale symptoms, had taken him twice by taxi to treatment centers, only to be turned back at the gate for lack of beds. He died in his own bed, his arms thrashing violently and blood spewing out of his mouth, in front of his sons. The only thing the government can do is come for bodies  they are killing us, said Eric Gweah, 25. Another son, Marvin Gweah, 28, screamed, If the government can't work it out, let them give it up. Let the international community handle this.
Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 18, 2014: A relative grieves as a Liberian Red Cross burial team, dress themselves in full protective clothing, prior to removing the body of a suspected Ebola victim, Ofori Gweah, 62, on September 18, 2014 in central Monrovia, Liberia. Members of the burial team descended to the compound four times in the past four weeks, down a steep cliff to a riverside area here called Rockspring Valley. Each week, they had picked up a body that passed on the Ebola virus to the next person, and now they were back for the fifth. The crowd, seething beneath a sky of low clouds, erupted in anger.The family of the dead man, sick for six days with the hemorrhagic fevers telltale symptoms, had taken him twice by taxi to treatment centers, only to be turned back at the gate for lack of beds. He died in his own bed, his arms thrashing violently and blood spewing out of his mouth, in front of his sons. The only thing the government can do is come for bodies they are killing us, said Eric Gweah, 25. Another son, Marvin Gweah, 28, screamed, If the government can't work it out, let them give it up. Let the international community handle this. Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times DANIEL BEREHULAK
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 18, 2014: Members of a Liberian Red Cross burial team, remove the body of woman, a woman, 75, a suspected Ebola victim on September 18, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. In a neighborhood called PHP, community leaders gathered around a mosque explained to Mr. Korvayan, the burial team leader, that the body he had come to retrieve belonged to a 75-year-old woman who had died of a stroke. Absolutely no Ebola, they said, as Mr. Korvayan nodded. But when his team went to pick up the body from a dank room, Mr. Korvayan remembered that he had retrieved the womans daughter and nephew from the same room in the past month. Theyre trying to cover it up  its our third time here, he said, adding that the community, caught up in its own denials, continued to engage in funeral practices that helped spead Ebola. They told me that somebody even bathed the old womans body. 
Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 18, 2014: Members of a Liberian Red Cross burial team, remove the body of woman, a woman, 75, a suspected Ebola victim on September 18, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. In a neighborhood called PHP, community leaders gathered around a mosque explained to Mr. Korvayan, the burial team leader, that the body he had come to retrieve belonged to a 75-year-old woman who had died of a stroke. Absolutely no Ebola, they said, as Mr. Korvayan nodded. But when his team went to pick up the body from a dank room, Mr. Korvayan remembered that he had retrieved the womans daughter and nephew from the same room in the past month. Theyre trying to cover it up its our third time here, he said, adding that the community, caught up in its own denials, continued to engage in funeral practices that helped spead Ebola. They told me that somebody even bathed the old womans body. Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times DANIEL BEREHULAK
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 04, 2014:  Medical staff spray down a small plastic bag containing the blood sample of Hawa Konneh, 9, a suspected Ebola victim, as she lays on the dirt wrapped in a shawl in front of the Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) Ebola treatment centre, as her mother Masogbe sits near to her prior to Hawa's passing away on September 04, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. For the past one week the girl, Hawa Konneh, 9, had been unwell and had been vomitting and had diarrhea. Her father a taxi driver died of similar symptoms the week before in an Ebola Treatment Unit at JFK Medical Center. Her mother, Masogbe Konneh, 24, waited outside the treatment center to be sprayed down. Masogbe has one other daughter and is uncertain how she will support herself and her daughter. Hawa was lying down shaking at 7am and died later that morning according to her mother. 

Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 04, 2014: Medical staff spray down a small plastic bag containing the blood sample of Hawa Konneh, 9, a suspected Ebola victim, as she lays on the dirt wrapped in a shawl in front of the Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) Ebola treatment centre, as her mother Masogbe sits near to her prior to Hawa's passing away on September 04, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. For the past one week the girl, Hawa Konneh, 9, had been unwell and had been vomitting and had diarrhea. Her father a taxi driver died of similar symptoms the week before in an Ebola Treatment Unit at JFK Medical Center. Her mother, Masogbe Konneh, 24, waited outside the treatment center to be sprayed down. Masogbe has one other daughter and is uncertain how she will support herself and her daughter. Hawa was lying down shaking at 7am and died later that morning according to her mother. Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times DANIEL BEREHULAK
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 06, 2014: A member of a Liberian Red Cross burial team is disinfected, with chlorine sprayed on by a colleague, after having  removed the body of a man, a suspected Ebola victim from his home on September 06, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. 

Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 06, 2014: A member of a Liberian Red Cross burial team is disinfected, with chlorine sprayed on by a colleague, after having removed the body of a man, a suspected Ebola victim from his home on September 06, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times DANIEL BEREHULAK
Attention David Furst 
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 05, 2014: James Dorbor, 8, suspected to have Ebola, lays on the ground as his father Edward tried to get the boy to drink coconut water as, they wait for James to be admitted into the JFK Ebola treatment centre on September 05, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. James Dorbor,8, who had been sick for 3-4 days. Edward Dorbor, James father first took James to the SOS clinic, however medical staff were too afraid to treat the boy, as he was suffering with symptoms consistent with Ebola: extreme weakness, loss of appetite, toileting and vomitting. They referred him to the JFK Ebola treatment facility. That day the scene outside of the JFK hosiotal was chaotic. One boy lay dead in the back of an ambulance, as three of his family members sat in the back with him. People lay in the back of taxis unable to move and others in the back of cars and strewn over the floor, too week to stand, lay on benches. James lay outside of the JFK centre for hours, on the dirt underneath an makeshift shelter, before medical staff came out after Edward begged for assistance. James convulsed as he lay on the dirt, underneath a makeshift shelter outside of the Ebola treatment centre. According to health officials, James passed away shortly after being admitted that same day. 

Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times
Attention David Furst MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 05, 2014: James Dorbor, 8, suspected to have Ebola, lays on the ground as his father Edward tried to get the boy to drink coconut water as, they wait for James to be admitted into the JFK Ebola treatment centre on September 05, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. James Dorbor,8, who had been sick for 3-4 days. Edward Dorbor, James father first took James to the SOS clinic, however medical staff were too afraid to treat the boy, as he was suffering with symptoms consistent with Ebola: extreme weakness, loss of appetite, toileting and vomitting. They referred him to the JFK Ebola treatment facility. That day the scene outside of the JFK hosiotal was chaotic. One boy lay dead in the back of an ambulance, as three of his family members sat in the back with him. People lay in the back of taxis unable to move and others in the back of cars and strewn over the floor, too week to stand, lay on benches. James lay outside of the JFK centre for hours, on the dirt underneath an makeshift shelter, before medical staff came out after Edward begged for assistance. James convulsed as he lay on the dirt, underneath a makeshift shelter outside of the Ebola treatment centre. According to health officials, James passed away shortly after being admitted that same day. Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times DANIEL BEREHULAK
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 05, 2014: James Dorbor, 8, suspected to have Ebola, lays on the ground motionless and appeared to have died, as his father Edward Dorbor reacts in believeing the boy is dead, however the boy survived for a few more hours before passign away in the JFK Ebola treatment centre on September 05, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. James Dorbor,8, who had been sick for 3-4 days. Edward Dorbor, James father first took James to the SOS clinic, however medical staff were too afraid to treat the boy, as he was suffering with symptoms consistent with Ebola: extreme weakness, loss of appetite, toileting and vomitting. They referred him to the JFK Ebola treatment facility. That day the scene outside of the JFK hosiotal was chaotic. One boy lay dead in the back of an ambulance, as three of his family members sat in the back with him. People lay in the back of taxis unable to move and others in the back of cars and strewn over the floor, too week to stand, lay on benches. James lay outside of the JFK centre for hours, on the dirt underneath an makeshift shelter, before medical staff came out after Edward begged for assistance. James convulsed as he lay on the dirt, underneath a makeshift shelter outside of the Ebola treatment centre. According to health officials, James passed away shortly after being admitted that same day.
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - SEPTEMBER 05, 2014: James Dorbor, 8, suspected to have Ebola, lays on the ground motionless and appeared to have died, as his father Edward Dorbor reacts in believeing the boy is dead, however the boy survived for a few more hours before passign away in the JFK Ebola treatment centre on September 05, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. James Dorbor,8, who had been sick for 3-4 days. Edward Dorbor, James father first took James to the SOS clinic, however medical staff were too afraid to treat the boy, as he was suffering with symptoms consistent with Ebola: extreme weakness, loss of appetite, toileting and vomitting. They referred him to the JFK Ebola treatment facility. That day the scene outside of the JFK hosiotal was chaotic. One boy lay dead in the back of an ambulance, as three of his family members sat in the back with him. People lay in the back of taxis unable to move and others in the back of cars and strewn over the floor, too week to stand, lay on benches. James lay outside of the JFK centre for hours, on the dirt underneath an makeshift shelter, before medical staff came out after Edward begged for assistance. James convulsed as he lay on the dirt, underneath a makeshift shelter outside of the Ebola treatment centre. According to health officials, James passed away shortly after being admitted that same day. DANIEL BEREHULAK

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